A Selection of Writings

 

Hire Rabbi Seltzer to write your story today!

Dirshu: The Chofetz Chaim Connection

On the 82nd yahrtzeit of the Chofetz Chaim, a mission of prominent rabbanim and community leaders, led by Rav Dovid Hofstedter shlita, Nasi of Dirshu, traveled together to the burial place of one of Klal Yisrael’s most venerable leaders. Their aim: to daven for the hatzlachha of the nation at this time of great peril. They had been sent to daven for the entire nation, with special emphasis on those who study the halachic and mussar works of Chofetz Chaim on a daily basis.

This was Dirshu’s third time visiting Radin. A previous visit had taken place months earlier, in preparation for the Dirshu Daf HaYomi B’Halachah siyum on Mishnah Berurah. The trip had proven a resounding success, with some 20,000 names submitted to the Dirshu office to be mentioned at the Chofetz Chaim’s kever.

After the initial success of the earlier Dirshu trips to the Chofetz Chaim’s burial place, it was obvious to everyone involved that they would return yet again. The only question was when.

CLICK HERE TO READ THE REST OF THE ARTICLE


 

Dirshu: A Worldwide Achdus Phenomenon

This is the story of a concept that touched and changed countless people everywhere. It is a story of a nation closing ranks in times of danger with astonishing alacrity and focus. It is the story of the power of a good idea. It is the story of the recent “Yom Limud and Tefillah.”

It is very much a story of our time.

The “Yom Limud and Tefillah,” (presented also as a Day of Jewish Unity to our unaffiliated brethren) touched over 500,000 people! Participation continued even after the day was officially over, with more and more people signing on to be involved. By nighttime, when they were finally able to take stock on what had been one of the most amazing days ever, the organizers were able to recognize that their initiative had been supported by Jews literally ALL OVER THE WORLD!!

CLICK HERE TO READ THE REST OF THIS ARTICLE

Dirshu – The Power To Unite

When I told my friends I was being sent to Paris to cover the Dirshu Daf HaYomi B’Halacha, Mishnah Berurah siyum – I saw a certain look crossing every face. How should I put this delicately? They were afraid.

“Are you sure it’s safe,” they wanted to know.

“Yes,” I replied. “I’m going from the airport to the convention center and back to the airport.”

“Okay,” they said, somewhat mollified. “As long as it’s safe.”

rtainly I had a chavrusah for an hour but it was just learning without heart. Then I discovered Dirshu. Now I am learning an average of 6 hours a day Gemara and I am planning on adding Daf HaYomi B’Halacha.” Rav Yissocher Frand, inimitably and succinctly exclaimed, “Dirshu has taught us not only that you have to learn, but that you have to know!”

CLICK HERE TO READ THE REST OF THIS ARTICLE


 

A Night Never to Be Forgotten: A First-Hand Account of the Dirshu Siyum HaShas

The rows of light-blue seats were filled to capacity on Monday night in Heichal Nokia (Nokia Stadium, also known as Yad Eliyahu Stadium), Tel Aviv’s premier sports arena. But instead of the usual rowdy crowd of sports fans clad in the team colors and singing their team’s theme song, I found myself staring at a huge, diverse group of Israel’s foremost Torah scholars, here to celebrate what many consider to be the Torah Jew’s dream-come-true: the Siyum HaShas. This event takes place only once in seven-and-a-half years, celebrating the completion of the Talmud, and tens of thousands of Jews, young and old, look forward to it.

CLICK HERE TO READ THE REST OF THIS ARTICLE

“Thoughts” by Rabbi Nachman Seltzer: About a Man In Prison

I have a friend who while learning in Lakewood many years ago, found himself stranded in BoroPark on erev Sukkos. He had been supposed to go to Montreal for Yom Tov, but had left his passport in the dorm, not knowing that he needed it to cross the Canadian border. Miserably disappointed at having his plans fall through, the bochur began walking up and down the avenue searching for a miracle. He tried asking a few people for directions to a local yeshiva, hoping that they would pick up on his desperation, but nobody did.

CLICK HERE TO READ THE REST OF THIS ARTICLE

“Thoughts” by Rabbi Nachman Seltzer: – WAR

When I first began writing this column for YWN, I never dreamed that it would turn out to be a column about war – but our three boys were kidnapped and brutally murdered shortly after my first column appeared and events snowballed as they tend to do in the Middle East. These days my thoughts run in so many directions that I can barely keep up with them myself. I’m thinking about a letter that a soldier wrote to all of us from Gaza. I’m thinking about the soldier whose mother insisted that he take a copy of the Sefer Noam Elimelech along with him into the battlefield

 

“Thoughts” by Rabbi Nachman Seltzer: Conversation With A Five Year Old (My Son) About Hamas Rockets

It happened last night during Maariv. Suddenly after a few days quiet in RBS, a siren went off. Everyone in the shul waited anxiously to see what was going to happen and in fact about fifteen seconds later, we heard the sound of a thunderclap and the entire building shook. Literally shook. It left everyone in the building feeling just a little shaken up. Okay, a lot shook up. I got home from shul a few minutes later.

My five year old son was sitting on the coach feeling very upset.

“Why does Hashem let the Goyim send rockets at us,” he wanted to know.

Before I could even begin to reply, (maybe touching on the concept on doing teshuva etc…) he came up with another question.

“Why did Hashem even create Arabs in the first place?”

CLICK HERE TO READ THE REST OF THIS ARTICLE

“Thoughts” by Rabbi Nachman Seltzer: #BringBackOurBoys & The Circle Of Hope

When I was learning in yeshiva a young Israeli soldier named Nachshon Waxman was kidnapped by Arabs pretending to be religious Jews. Their car sported seforim lying on the dash board and Jewish music was blaring from the radio. Nachshon was convinced that they were frum people. He got into their car and they kidnapped him. He was incarcerated in an Arab neighborhood adjacent to Ramot, which could be seen from my yeshiva window, right across the valley from Sorotzkin. Over one hundred thousand Jews of every stripe and persuasion gathered at the Kosel to daven for his safe release.

CLICK HERE TO READ THE REST OF THIS ARTICLE